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Organizing the Woodshop help... Options
Reynolds
Posted: Monday, October 13, 2008 10:11:13 AM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 10/13/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Willard
I am a third year middle school Industrial Technology teacher. I inherited the old high school shop when our district built a new 30 mil dollar high school. So I have a substantial shop - certainly bigger than most middle schools.

However, the old HS teacher (now gone) left the old shop in disarray and I have over the course of the last couple years gotten it much more organized and efficient.

But I'm still needing help. I would love to habe some more ideas and tips of what you use and how yuo organize: lumber, hardwoods, handtools (i do have a fairly nice tool cabinet), power tools (I have lots of drills, jig saws, circular saws, etc.

What are some things that work for you?

creighta
Posted: Monday, October 13, 2008 11:55:24 AM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 1/16/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Georgetown/OH
I reduced the number of workbenches in my shop drastically. I used to have ten big benches and no room to work. Now I have three main benches in the middle of the shop and a few smaller benches on the walls.

As far as set up goes, you need like tools together to accomodate specific assignments. The tablesaw should be faced so that the user's back is facing a wall that gets relatively little use, and you will want at least one drill press near your scrollsaws.

After that buy some materials and build something big. It won't take you long to figure out what seems inconvenient.

Also, if you find that you have equipment that never gets used, get rid of it or hide it somewhere to save space for something you will use.
Mike Walsh
Posted: Monday, October 13, 2008 12:24:03 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 9/13/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Allegan MI
Get out of your shop !

Talk to your supervisor for approval, so you can take off early one afternoon, ( you may have to skip a pep rally ! ), arrange for a meet up on a Sat morn... or use part of your schools exam or grading day...

Go visit other shops. Meet some great teachers. Ask what works. Ask why they have that brand. Look at the kids projects, copy lesson plans, quizzes, ... Schedule TGIF w/ beverage / snacks get togethers with local shop teachers, find out if there is a TechEd round table in your region...

Talk to vendors who visit you. Ask who is the best local teacher. They'll know.

I'll bet you get more out of a couple of quick visits than you got out of your "History of American Education 301".
Reynolds
Posted: Monday, October 13, 2008 1:17:00 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 10/13/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Willard
Id really like a good idea for how and where to store power tools (drills, circular saws, palm sanders, jog saws, etc.) - They are used with such regularity that I don't think that putting them in their case is the most efficient.

How do you all store these items for easy use?

audell
Posted: Monday, October 13, 2008 2:12:46 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/16/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Janesville, WI
For storing power tools we made a long (about 8') miter saw table that wheels around with drawers underneath for the power tools. Think: cabinets with wheels. Now we have all of the power tools in one area and a roll-around miter saw with stock support in the form of countertops on each side. Plus, we can move all of the power tools around wherever we want/need them.
We were able to fit every type of tool we have in the drawers, even the circular saws and our large PC routers.
We're able to lock everything up in their drawers with some keyed locks.
Jeffseiver
Posted: Monday, October 13, 2008 11:49:11 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 11/22/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Mission Viejo/Calif.
reynolds, take a look at my room on the pods casts( check out your other post). I don't like the idea of middle school kids using circular saws, but that's up to you. I setup and cut on the table saw for the kids. I set it up so that the hand tools are in one area. Scroll saws in their own area. with little room between the kids when they are working there to minimize the possability of bumping during work. Lathe's in their own area. The chop saw just behind the table saw area with a very large 4x8 table in front. I stand most of the time at or around the table saw so that I am close to the chop saw( just to be close)when they are using it. I have table top drill presses and routers together. I setup 6 16' long tables with 4 vices each. i did that so that when we are drafting they are all facing one direction. When we are woodworking they can only work so many to a table and it divides them up into small groups.Anyway enough talking. I am continually changing up what I do. This year I have one class of 8th graders for the entire year and I am going to make them build six small6x6x8 sheds. for the second semester. but they are going to have to pick one of 3 types.
creighta
Posted: Wednesday, October 15, 2008 7:16:10 AM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 1/16/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Georgetown/OH
I had my kids build a 3-pc unit that is 4' wide and 8' tall. I put all hand tools in drawers in the middle section, I hang large items on peg board at top, and the bottom is boxed into divided shelves for power tools. I also made drill holsters to hang on the side of the cabinet so I don't have to take up shelf space w/ them.

Somewhere in the archives there is probably a link to pics of this unit, but I can't get to photobucket anymore.
salthunter
Posted: Wednesday, October 15, 2008 1:42:30 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 5/14/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Pocatello Idaho
I make sure certian tools are moveable. My shapers are used for 4 weeks,.. they are moved out of the shop when not needed,.. same with one of the table saws,. I have a side storage for items when not in use. A project where all the palm and sheet sandedr\s are used they are mover to a table along the wall
I do keep a multiple set of tools on a board, and many of those items the hanging hooks can hold multiple tools, an examaple 1 framing square or 7 if were working on a unit where needed
Work benches can be flipped and stacked if more floor space is need
creighta
Posted: Thursday, October 16, 2008 7:23:06 AM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 1/16/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Georgetown/OH
Got through to photobucket now,

http://s262.photobucket.com/albums/ii103/creighta/?action=view&current=toolctr.jpg

I hope this link works.
Gene Luby
Posted: Thursday, October 16, 2008 2:02:11 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 9/19/2008
Posts: 0
Location: By The Jersey Shore
I all-so inherited a large shop,5 years ago.I teach in a HS (9-12).I run a Construction Tech program + add woodshop projects to spice things up during the school year.We are framing a small 200sq ft house in the shop,it was close to 300sq ft a year ago.I decided that we needed more floor space and added 2 more workbenches(total 4) for wood working projects.I put moble bases on some machines,tablesaw,jointer etc.We have seperate storage rooms ,one I keep all the power hand tools ,the other hand tools.I store construction lumber outside,hardwoods up in a loft.My shop is constanly changing from year to year,you learn what works and what does'nt.I was lucky,this summer my school renovated our science rooms and labs,I removed about 2 dozen cabinets,they were all in good condition,I used them in my tool & storage rooms,I am a big recycler of materials .Gene
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